Monday, October 8, 2018

Why I've Been Away For So Long

It's been such a long time since I've been here, I'm sure there's no one left to read this blog. However, I feel that I owe you an explanation. It's not an easy one.

My mother has Alzheimers.

It runs in our family, my grandfather had it. My mother's sister was diagnosed in the 90's with it. (Although, there's more to her diagnosis than was previously thought.) I began to notice the early signs in my mother about eight years ago when we were on vacation in Rhode Island. I tried to talk to my brothers about it, but they were both in denial. As well as my father.

Cut to three years ago when things really started to go south. I begged her to get diagnosed--perhaps we could get some medication to help. Nope. She denied the signs. So did my father.

Finally, after much urging, (a car accident, almost a fire in the house on Thanksgiving, and a flood in the basement) did my father say "Yes, we need a diagnosis." My mother hated me for it.

After another year, after much pleading, begging, and arguing, did my father realize we needed more help than I alone could give her. Up until then I was her primary caregiver.

The help didn't work out the way I intended it -- to give me more free time to continue my writing--and in the end, my father finally relented and hired a full time caregiver. She's not working out the way I intended either, however, she's there with my mother for most of the day, which has FINALLY left me time to get back to work.

There's so much more to this story than I'm willing to share on the blog -- perhaps someday -- but for those of you who are living with or working with or know someone with this dreaded disease, you will understand. Not only does it destroy them, it destroys everyone who loves them.

However, for the purposes of this blog, I just wanted to let you know why I've been away for so long. But I'm back now and hopefully, will continue on this blog until the remainder of the The Ladies of Dunbury series is finished. (Five more books.)

I will try and post every other week on Monday. I hope to see you around. Or at least measure a click on my analytics. I'll also be around on Twitter. You can watch the word count as I post it. @gallagher_anne

Anne Gallagher (c) 2018

Sunday, October 15, 2017

Characters for Judging Prudence

I'm one of those writers who needs pictures of the characters I have in my head. And because I'm having a lot of trouble with Pinterest these days, (maybe I should have my 12 year old daughter post them for me) I thought I would show them to you here first. Besides, I finally was able to view the boards I have, and if you don't know where to look, you won't know who half of them are. The perils of modern technology.

Anyway... These are the characters for JUDGING PRUDENCE.
Alexander Lowell, Viscount Abernathy

Prudence Shaffer



Alexander's brother, George









                               






Alexander's grandfather,
Earl of  Westmoreland


Lady Lowell, Alexander's mother





       



Alexander's sister, Christina,
Lady Eaves
Lady Lowell's sister, Lady Carter



Alexander's Grandmother, Lady Westmoreland

Patience, Prudence's sister














Lady Prudence Shaffer is the most disliked of all the Dunbury Ladies. She holds no regard for the feelings of others; her caustic tongue and acerbic wit leaves her friendless save for her sister. No one understands the cause for Prudence’s bad manners. She was raised to be a lady, after all.

Alexander Lowell, Viscount Abernathy, dares to brave her criticisms, sees through the veneer she has painted herself with, and finds her attractive enough to court. He realizes he must tame her wicked language if he wishes his mother to consent to a marriage between them.

However, one iniquitous remark at a ball about Lady Lowell has left Prudence dealing with its after effects. She is shunned within Society and her remaining unmarried cousins along with her. A simple apology will not suffice—Lady Lowell refuses to hear it, or allow her son to marry her.

Prudence must change her disapproving ways if she wants her heart’s desire.

It is not as easy as she thinks when no one believes she can.


Coming Soon.

(Before Christmas. Hopefully, by Thanksgiving, but don't count on it. Let's just say sometime around the holidays.)


Anne Gallagher (c) 2017

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Working On The Next Book-- Judging Prudence

I recently found the impetus to begin working on the next book in the Ladies of Dunbury series-- Judging Prudence. I would love to finish it by Thanksgiving, but given the circumstances of my life these days, probably more like Christmas. We'll see. Maybe I'll catch a break.

It is more or less a comedy of manners, bad manners for a lady in Regency England. However, Prudence is not the girl we think we see. I won't tell you what her problem is now, but it eventually comes out in the book.  



Lady Prudence Shaffer is the most disliked of all the Dunbury Ladies. She holds no regard for the feelings of others; her caustic tongue and acerbic wit leaves her friendless save for her sister. No one understands the cause for her bad manners, least of all Uncle Henry. Prudence was raised to be a lady, after all.

Alexander Lowell, Viscount Abernathy, dares to brave her criticisms, sees through the veneer she has painted herself with, and finds her attractive enough to court. He realizes he must tame her wicked language if he wishes his mother to consent to a marriage between them.

However, one iniquitous remark at a ball about Lady Lowell has left Prudence dealing with its after effects. She is shunned within Society and her remaining unmarried cousins along with her. A simple apology will not suffice—Lady Lowell refuses to hear it, or allow her son to marry her.

Prudence must change her disapproving ways if she wants her heart’s desire.

It is not as easy as she thinks, when no one believes she can.

Anne Gallagher (c) 2017

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

Being a Jane Austen purist, I was quite horrified when Seth Grahame-Smith published his book Pride and Prejudice and Zombies in 2009. To date, the novel has over 100,000
reviews on Goodreads with a solid 4 star rating. I refused to read it. How dare he parody Dear Jane. To me it was as sacrilegious as desecrating the Bible.

That being said, this morning as I was checking email, I happened to stumble across the movie version on my free movie weekend package offered by my television provider. I didn't see the first 20 minutes, but became quite engaged with the plot as I watched.

Okay, let me rephrase that-- I became quite engaged with Sam Riley's portrayal as Mr. Darcy. I mean, who doesn't love Darcy? Even a zombie killing Darcy. Lilly James was also quite good as Lizzie Bennett. I have to say I just about fell off my chair as I watched Lizzie try to kill Darcy after he declared his love for her at Rosings.
Who doesn't love Darcy in black leather?

Granted, the plot was stupid--zombies? Really? However, I did like the way Grahame-Smith (and Burr Steers as the screenwriter) kept most of Dear Jane's indomitable words intact. It was, I have to admit, kind of fun to see how they were used in spite of the undead gracing the screen.

I loved the costumes! I can't say that enough. Lots of black leather encasing genteel 18th century fashion--a new trend I would love to emulate. Alas, I'm afraid it would not look as good on me as it did them.

Lilly James did a credible job as Lizzie Bennett, given the script. She showed as much pluck as the original Lizzie.

And I hated George Wickham with the same veracity that I did when I read the original. Even without knowing the plot, I knew he was a zombie.

However, I was quite disappointed with the ending. I wanted something more, but don't know what. In all the movie versions I've watched, the ending is the same--Darcy and Elizabeth and Jane and Bingley marry. With zombies added into the mix, I kind of thought it would be different. I always watch the credits and was surprised there was a snippet more, but that wasn't the ending I wanted.

Anyway, if you're looking for a weirdly fun adventure with an old favorite, watch this. I can honestly say, I will see it again. I know it doesn't have favorable ratings as a movie, but I'd give it 4 out of 5 stars.

Anne Gallagher (c) 2017